Classes

EMR 121 Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Eric Henson
Tuesdays, 2:10pm-4:00pm

This field-based research course focuses on some of the major issues that Native American Indian tribes and nations face as the 21st century begins. It provides in-depth, hands-on exposure to native development issues, including: sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, leadership, health and social welfare, land and water rights, culture and language, religious freedom, and education. In particular, the course emphasizes problem definition, client relationships, and designing and completing a research project. The course...

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Reading Course on Muskogee Culture

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Ann Braude

Time: TBD

Initiated by a Muskogee student, this course will be advised by Prof. Ann Braude (Harvard Divinity) and Marcus Briggs-Cloud, HDS 2010. Any student interested in indigenous history and culture of the Southeastern US is welcome. Meeting time to be arranged. Permission of the Instructor required. For further information contact ann_braude@harvard.edu.

 

AFVS197K: Cinemas of Resistance: Political Filmmaking Across the Globe

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Katherine Rennebohm
Fall 2019, Wednesday, 3-5:45pm

Can film change the world? What can the history of engaged film and media-making teach us about politics, and vice-versa? This course will study instances of political filmmaking from around the world: early 20th century avant-garde filmmaking, anti-colonialist and anti-imperialist cinemas, feminist and queer filmmaking, Indigenous cinemas, and more. Students will learn about different political movements, international histories of film theory and film form, and the ongoing legacies of cinemas of...

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ENGLISH282A: Ethnic Studies: Past, Present Future

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Ju Yon Kim
Fall 2019, Tuesdays, 9:45-11:45am

An interdisciplinary graduate research seminar exploring cutting-edge approaches in ethnic studies. From its institutional beginnings in the late-1960s, the field of ethnic studies built frameworks to critically examine questions of inequality and power through intersecting analytical paradigms of race, indigeneity, gender, sexuality, class, and citizenship. With visiting scholars at Harvard’s Warren Center, students will explore how such frameworks remain useful and relevant, interrogate limitations and...

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DPI391: Race, Inequality, and American Democracy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Megan Francis
Fall 2019, Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:15-2:30pm

The United States’ global dominance has long been the envy of the world. But the role of race to native born and newcomer alike has been treated often as aberrational, an unfortunate artifact of the nation’s past. This course examines the nature of race at the heart of the American project through the lens of wealth creation, labor markets, political culture, social institutions, immigration and civic life. Although race often attaches to people of color, racial identity and ideology have been...

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HIST-LIT90DJ: From Wounded Knee to Standing Rock: Native America in the Twentieth Century

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Christopher Clements
Fall 2019, Mondays, 9:45-11:45am

This course will explore various forms of Native American cultural and political production in the twentieth century. Drawing on fiction, film, historical documents, documentaries, photographs, nonfiction, and memoirs, this class will explore the ways in which Indigenous people have articulated both belonging and separateness from the United States. In addition to its focus on key aspects of modern indigenous culture and politics—sovereignty, self-determination, decolonization, anti-racism, gender...

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FRSEMR631: The First Americans: Portraits of Indigenous Power and Diplomacy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Shawon Kinew
Fall 2019, Friday, 12-2:45pm

Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is home to 25 oil portraits of indigenous American leaders painted in the first half of the 19th century. Originally commissioned to preserve cultures an American bureaucrat feared would be extinct, these paintings transcend a moribund history. In fact, the Native American nations represented are still here. Moreover, these portraits have much to teach us about diplomacy, power, representation and indigeneity in 2019. The Peabody portraits, painted by the...

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RELIGION1519: Issues in the Studies of Native American Religion

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Anne Braude
Fall 2019, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:30-11:45am

Based around a series of traditionalist guest speakers, this course interrogates the study of religion in general and of Native American traditions in particular in light of indigenous religious experiences, perspectives and histories. Questions of appropriation, repatriation and religious freedom will be approached through legal as well as cultural frameworks.

HIST14M: “Black Indians”: The Making of an Identity

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Tiya Miles
Fall 2019, Wednesday, 12-2pm

This seminar will explore intersections in African American and Native American histories with an emphasis on pivotal moments in the shaping of a modern identity referred to as “Black Indian.” Students in this seminar will explore and analyze historical contexts and contingencies leading to thick interactions between people of African descent and indigenous Americans as well as experiential testimony by individuals asserting mixed race and/or bi-cultural Afro-Native identities. During our time together, students will...

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ANTHRO1190: The Invasion of America: The Anthropology of American Encounters, 1492-1830

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Matt Liebmann
Fall 2019, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00-1:15pm

In 1492 Native Americans discovered Europeans, changing the world forever. The European invasion of the Americas triggered demographic, economic, and ecological changes on an unprecedented scale. The subsequent movement of plants, animals, and goods prompted global shifts in population, exploitation of resources, and the transformation of environments on both sides of the Atlantic. What can archaeology tell us about early encounters between Native Americans and Europeans? Why did the European...

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HL90DX: Environmental Justice in North America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Arianne Sedef Urus
Fall 2019, Wednesdays, 9:45 – 11:45am

This course examines how the right to natural resources became contested in North America following European conquest and westward expansion, with a particular emphasis on the period before 1865. Sometimes these contested resources have been clean air, soil, and water, while at other times they included fisheries, forests, agricultural fields, animal pastures, or oil. From when pilgrims first arrived at Plymouth Rock in 1620, race, class, and gender have been the determining factors in regulating...

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ANTH1900: Counseling as Colonization? Native American Encounters with the Clinical Psy-ences

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Joseph Gone
Fall 2019, Mondays, 12:00pm-2:45pm 

American Indian, First Nations, and other Indigenous communities of the USA and Canada contend with disproportionately high rates of “psychiatric” distress. Many of these communities attribute this distress to their long colonial encounters with European settlers. Concurrently, throughout the 20th century, the disciplines and professions associated with mind, brain, and behavior (e.g., psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis) consolidated their authority and influence within mainstream society. These “psy-...

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