Courses

Starting in Fall 2020, the courses listed below are organized into three categories.

HUNAP Faculty - Courses are taught by members of HUNAP’s faculty board and cover Indigenous topics.

Indigenous Focused - Courses taught by members of the general faculty at Harvard and cover Indigenous topics as their primary focus.

Indigenous Units/Readings Featured - Courses taught by the general faculty and may have components of their course related to Indigenous topics. 

Spring 2021 - HUNAP Faculty

DEV 501M Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building I

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Joe Kalt
January Term, 1/12, 1/13, 1/14, 1/15

This course examines the challenges that contemporary Native American tribes and nations face as they endeavor to rebuild their communities, strengthen their cultures, and support their citizens. The range of issues that Native leaders and policymakers confront is wide and encompass political sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, cultural promotion, land and water rights, religious freedom, health and social welfare, and education. Because the challenges are broad and comprehensive, the course emphasizes the...

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GOV 1338 Institutional Development in Native America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Dan Carpenter
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

Examines the challenges and strategies of advocacy, sovereignty building and institutional development among Native Nations in the U.S.  Includes engaged scholarship working with Native Nations on these issues.

HIST 1015 Native American Women: History and Myth

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Tiya Miles
Teaching Fellow: Sarah Sadlier
Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM ET

This combined lecture/discussion course explores histories of women from diverse Indigenous nations within the current boundaries of the United States. The course traces multiple themes that intersect Native women’s lives: concepts of family and intimate relationships; spiritual understandings and notions of tradition; gender roles and cross-cultural gender difference; processes and kinds of colonialism, conceptions of land and effects of land dispossession; cultural negotiation, change, and...

Read more about HIST 1015 Native American Women: History and Myth

HIST 97P "What is Indigenous History?"

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Phil Deloria
Sophomore Tutorial, History Department
Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM ET

What is it to be Indigenous?  Is indigeneity a contemporary political formation, the product of centuries of colonial and imperial incursions into the lands of others?  Is it an aboriginal, autochthonous presence that has existed from ancient time, with a continuity based on both survival and self-possession?  Or something else entirely?  While many first peoples prefer culturally specific identities over the general term indigenous, others embrace Indigeneity...

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Spring 2021 - Indigenous Focused Courses

ANTHRO 1490 Something Else: Material Revolutions in Indigenous Activism

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2021

Zoe Eddy
Tuesdays, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET

 

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of how North American Indigenous communities, particularly women and two-spirit people, navigate activist movements through material culture and media. We will examine Indigenous material culture across various timelines and focus specifically on trajectories of objects of resistance. Students will learn how to approach material objects from a historical perspective as well as how to consider these objects in their current cultural context. In addition to...

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DEV 502 Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2021

Eric Henson
Tuesdays, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM ET

This community based research course focuses on some of the major issues Native American Indian tribes and nations face in the 21st century. It provides in-depth, hands-on exposure to native development issues, including: sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, leadership, health and social welfare, tribal finances, land and water rights, culture and language, religious freedom, and education. In particular, the course emphasizes problem definition, client relationships, and designing and completing a research...

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EMR 145 Latinx Xicanx Indigeneities

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Marcelo Garzo
Wednesdays, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET

In this advanced seminar course, we will explore questions of indigeneity and decolonization in Latinx and Xicanx communities and diasporas across Abya Yala (the Americas, including the Caribbean). Thinking from the intersections of Latinx/Xicanx and Native/Indigenous Studies and communities — and through a comparative and critical Ethnic Studies lens — we will trace key terms and concepts that emerge from these important transdisciplinary fields, social movements and debates. How does indigeneity relate to concepts such as...

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Spring 2021 - Courses with Indigenous Topics and Readings

ENG 190EV Voices of Environmental Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Sarah Dimick
Mondays/Wednesdays, 3:00 PM - 4:15 PM ET

This course considers the relationships between systems of human injustice and environmental issues—including industrial disasters, ocean acidification, and resource extraction. We examine environmental justice writing and artwork with a transnational, interconnected approach. For example, we ask how the Ogoni activist Ken Saro-Wiwa’s writing on oil pipelines in the Niger Delta anticipates Native American protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline. We draw connections between a poem documenting...

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EXPOS 20 204 Wastelands

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Collier Brown
Undergraduate Seminar
Dates/Time: TBA

The impenetrable wilderness of The Revenant, the diseased streets of Children of Men, the trash heap cities of Wall-E—these are the wastelands that fascinate our pop culture. On the screen, they come to life as horrifying alternate universes and dead civilizations—the very fates we must avoid at all costs. And yet wastelands are not exclusively the stuff of science fiction. In this course, we will grapple with both imaginary and actual wastelands. We will begin with short...

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GENED 1089 The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021
Why does the Mexico-U.S. border continue to be a space for debate and controversy? This course examines how the creation of the U.S.-Mexico border in 1848 shaped modern Mexican society from the nineteenth century to our present. For many, the border served (and serves) as a protective barrier from poverty, violence, and, especially, disease. By the early twentieth century many Mexican bodies were perceived as “alien,” “illegal,” and in need of patrolling. Yet these descriptions were also used by Mexican politicians to describe and isolate groups such as Indigenous and Chinese within... Read more about GENED 1089 The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

GENED 1159 American Capitalism

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Sven Beckert
Tuesdays/Thursdays/ 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

How did capitalism emerge, expand and transform daily life in North America over the past 500 years? In this course, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how North America turned from a minor outpost of the Atlantic economy into the powerhouse of the world economy, how Americans built a capitalist economy and how that capitalism, in turn, changed every aspect of their lives.  In the process, they will come to understand how contemporary capitalism is the result of centuries of human engagement, struggle...

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GOV 94MK The Politics of Land, Resources, and Colonialism in North America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Katie Mazer
Dates/Times: TBA

This course examines the colonial basis of the continental political economy of the United States and Canada, which has long been understood as the United States’ main resource hinterland. It offers students a range of analytical tools through which to understand contemporary contestation over land and resources in both countries. Drawing on writings by political scientists, geographers, anthropologists, and historians, the course moves between theories of nature and settler colonialism; Indigenous perspectives that transcend and exceed...

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HIST 1636 Intro to Harvard History: Beyond the Three Lies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Zach Nowak
Mondays/Wednesdays, 7:30 PM - 8:45 PM ET

Harvard’s history is a story of professors, students, courses, and research that has led to world-changing innovations. But it is also a story of student unrest, gender unease, and the exclusion of women and minorities, enslaved people, Native Americans, and working-class people. All of them made Harvard and left traces in its archives, libraries, and museums, its buildings, and even in its soil. Some Harvard stories have been told; others have been forgotten. In this class, we will uncover Harvard’s past...

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HIST-LIT 90ES Prison Abolition

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Thomas Dichter
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

Is prison abolition a serious proposal, an aspirational ideal, a trendy slogan, or a blueprint for social transformation? This interdisciplinary and community-engaged course situates the prison abolition movement in deep historical context and explores its current relation to the politics of criminal justice reform. We will study the movement’s connections to slavery abolitionism, anti-lynching activism, Indigenous struggles for sovereignty, and the Black Power movement. We will examine the emergence...

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HISTSCI 123CS Starstruck! The History, Culture, and Politics of American Astronomy

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2021

Sara Schechner
Tuesdays, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET

This hands-on course will introduce key episodes and issues in the history of American astronomy by close looking at rare early scientific instruments and tangible objects in Harvard collections.  Starting with the story of Captain John Smith, Pocahontas, and a sundial, the course will move from colonial relations with Native Americans to the controversial placement of observatories on sacred mountaintops today.  In between, we will discuss the roles of religion, politics, science, and culture in the...

Read more about HISTSCI 123CS Starstruck! The History, Culture, and Politics of American Astronomy

HLS 2033 Conflict of Laws

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2021

Joseph Singer, HUNAP Faculty Member
Open to Upper Level JD students
Mondays/Tuesdays, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

 

This course examines how courts choose which law should be applied to transactions, relationships, or occurrences having contacts with more than one state in the United States, or with a state in the United States and a foreign nation. The course will also touch on adjudicatory jurisdiction, recognition of foreign judgments, and tribal sovereignty of American Indian nations. We will address the various approaches adopted by states and...

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IGA 105 International Law and Global Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Kathryn Sinkkink
Mondays/Wednesdays, 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM ET

Can international law be a tool for promoting global justice? We will explore whether international criminal accountability for mass atrocity can deter human rights violations and satisfy victims.  Should reparations be given for slavery?  Can environmental law help reduce climate change and provide justice for climate refugees? Can trade law contribute to a fairer and more equitable trade system? Could better international health law mitigate a future crisis like COVID-19?  We will use a global...

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IGA 455 -2 Environmental Politics: Building Power Through Leadership, Persuasion and Negotiation

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Radolph Wentworth
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

 

In this perilous moment in human history, the world desperately needs leaders with the courage, drive and hardball political skills to fight climate change and help restore the natural world. At the same time, we need leaders who will advocate for social equity, recognizing how marginalized and low-income communities suffer disproportionately from pollution and climate change.Leadership is difficult in any enterprise, but it is especially difficult for environmental leaders who face opponents with...

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Fall 2020 - HUNAP Faculty

ANTHRO 2859: Colonial Encounters, Postcolonial Disorders

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Joseph Gone and Byron Good 
Time(s): Tuesdays, TBD

This course will engage three major themes. First, it will review issues related to the complex relationships between anthropology and colonialism(s) and their after lives in the postcolonial settings in which anthropologists work. While it is not a course focused narrowly on anthropology and...

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GENED 1105: Can We Know Our Past?

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Matt Liebmann 
Monday/Wednesday 10:00 AM 

What happened in the past? How do you know? Even though today we take great pains to document every major event that occurs, more than 99% of human history is not written down. How, then, can we determine with any certainty what people did, let alone thought about, hundreds, thousands, and even millions of...

Read more about GENED 1105: Can We Know Our Past?

HISTORY 1006: Introduction to Native American and Indigenous

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Philip J Deloria 
Monday/Wednesday, 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM 

In the 2010 U.S. Census, 5.2 million people identified themselves as being of American Indian or Alaska Native descent.  Of these, 2.9 million identified themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native alone, about 1.7 percent of the nation’s population.  These demographics...

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History 14M.01: “Black Indians”: History, Identity, Theory

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Tiya Miles 
Wednesdays 12-2:45pm 

 In 1920, Carter G. Woodson (the “father of Black history”) argued the following in the Journal of Negro History: “One of the longest unwritten chapters of the history of the United States is that treating of the relations of the Negroes and the Indians.” Historians have endeavored to write that...

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Tribal Sovereignty Reading Group

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

(Open to 1L HLS students only) 
Professor Joseph William Singer 
Tentative Meeting Dates: Meeting time: 5:00 to 7:00 pm  
Dates: Tue Sept 15, Tue Sept 29, Wed Oct 14, Tue Oct 27 

There are currently 574 federally-recognized Indian nations within the territorial boundaries of the United States. The U.S. has...

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Fall 2020 - Indigenous Focused

STU 1501 This Land is Your Land (M1)

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Daniel D'Oca
Tuesday/Thursday  2:00 pm - 6:00 pm

 

In the US, there are over 300 federal Indian reservations, covering over 50 million acres of land in 36 states. However, a majority of Native Americans—as many as 78 percent—live off reservations in urban areas. Since the passage of the Indian Relocation Act of 1956, which encouraged Native Americans to assimilate into the general population by moving to cities, the population of so-called “urban Indians” has been increasing rapidly. But the assumptions behind the Indian Relocation Act and similarly...

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HIST-LIT 90EM: Empire and Archive in the Colonial Americas

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Alan Niles 
Wednesdays 12:00-2:45 

How do we know the histories of colonialism and empire? In this course, we will study how European expansion in the Americas fueled and was fueled by the production of records and representations of colonial spaces and their peoples. We will study how violence and resistance shaped alternative systems of...

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IGA 671: Policy and Social Innovation for the Changing Arctic

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Halla Logadottir 
Tuesdays/Thursdays 7:30 AM – 8:45 AM (or 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM on Thursday) 

Climate change is transforming the Arctic region. The region is warming at least twice as fast as the global average, and as the ice retreats on the top of our planet, it is unleashing challenges with local, regional, and global implications across multiple policy...

Read more about IGA 671: Policy and Social Innovation for the Changing Arctic

HLS 2193: Natural Resources Law

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Robert Anderson (Oneida Nation Law Chair at HLS) 
Monday/Tuesday 9:10 AM – 10:10 AM 

This course will provide you with a basic understanding and overview of the fundamental principles of public land law and federal natural resource management. The class covers general principles and several federal resources management regimes with a brief...

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HLS 2002: American Indian Law

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Robert Anderson (Oneida Nation Law Chair at HLS) 
Monday/Tuesday 3:20 PM – 4:50 PM 

Students in this class will study the colonization process leading to the present day status of Indian tribes as sovereigns within the United States. We will study the policies, statutes, and caselaw that makes up the fabric of federal Indian law. Equal...

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Fall 2020 - Indigenous Units/Readings in Course

WOMGEN 97: Tutorial - Sophomore Year “Dreams of a Common Language”

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2020

Caroline Light
Tuesday/Thursday 10:30 am - 11:45 am

This course provides an introduction (in no way exhaustively) to key concepts and texts in the study of women, gender, and sexuality. Together, we will develop a shared vocabulary to help prepare you for advanced study in the concentration. We will become adept in using foundational concepts such as essentialism, historical “waves” of feminism, intersectionality, homonationalism, neoliberalism, borderlands, mestiza consciousness, critical trans studies, and gender as a category of analysis. We will...

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WOMGEN 1278 Interracial Intimacy: Sex, Race, and Romance in the U.S.

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Marya T. Mtshali
Tuesday, 3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

What assumptions about race and sex are embedded in the term “interracial,” and why are different types of interracial relationships viewed differently? How did White fears of relationships between Black men and White women influence the creation of the Ku Klux Klan? How did the story of Pocahontas influence the development of a settler colonial state?  This course investigates the significance of interracial intimate relations throughout United States history and through the lens of race, class, gender, and sexual...

Read more about WOMGEN 1278 Interracial Intimacy: Sex, Race, and Romance in the U.S.

HDS 3133 Religion and Race in the US: Case Studies on Brutality, Resistance, and Imagination II

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Melissa Bartholomew, Diana Moore
Tuesdays, 3:00 pm - 4:59 pm

 

Beginning with the arrival of Europeans in lands now known as the United States and continuing to the present day, religion has been and remains a powerful force in sanctioning white supremacy, inspiring resistance, and cultivating moral imagination. In this seminar, we will adopt a critical race theory framework to explore a series of case studies focused on race and racism in the U.S. to examine the complex ways that religion functions in explicit and implicit ways to promote and mitigate...

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WOMGEN 1310 Transgender Rights and the Law: Assumptions and Critiques

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Kendra Albert
Monday, 6 - 8:30 pm

How does American law treat transgender, genderfluid, nonbinary, agender, and gender‐nonconforming people? What assumptions about gender operate in legal doctrines, and how do these assumptions interact with the lives of transgender people, especially those at the intersection of multiple axes of oppression?

This seminar will discuss contemporary cases involving transgender rights, as well as historical cases where the rights of transgender people were directly or indirectly contested. Readings will incorporate case law, sociological...

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SOCIOL 90EQ: Research Lab: Equity through Inquiry: Pedagogy, Research, and Capacity Building Strategy Lab

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Flavia Perea 
Tuesdays, 12:45-2:45 (can be changed to better meet the needs of all students in the course) 

Course Description: This course will examine the principles and methods of community based, participatory, action, and decolonizing approaches to inquiry. In addition to developing this knowledge and skill-set among students in the course, the purpose of...

Read more about SOCIOL 90EQ: Research Lab: Equity through Inquiry: Pedagogy, Research, and Capacity Building Strategy Lab

Fall 2020 - Other Course Resources

The following links are to additional course resources on campus.

  • Courses on race, ethnicity and racism (Fall 2020) LINK
  • Ethnicity, Migration, Rights list of courses (Fall 2020) *coming soon*

Spring 2020

ANTHRO 163 Megafauna Among Us: Humans and Other Charismatic Animals

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Zoe Eddy
Thursdays, 3:00pm-5:45pm

Whales, wolves, great apes, big cats, buffalo, bears-- these animals populate human cultural imaginations. From animal advocacy groups to zoos to movies, so-called "charismatic megafauna" and/or “flagship species” dominate a wide swath of debates. By focusing on a selection of animals, this course explores a) how people interpret these animals, and b) how human interactions impact these animals and their natural environments. Organized around different animals and the controversies, questions, and events...

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EDU S515 Emancipatory Inquiry: Listening, Learning, and Acting for Social Change

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Aaliyah El-Amin
Wednesdays, 1:00pm-4:00pm

Throughout history, social justice movements and social justice organizations have utilized disciplined inquiry or research to highlight untold stories, illuminate goodness, expose power and colonialism, and offer pathways to more equity and freedom. Yet, we often do not provide educators or doctoral students with research methodology training oriented to these aims. More specifically, we often do not provide educators in the field or doctoral students with research methodology training beyond those...

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EDU T017: Alternative Modes of Education

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Houman Harouni
Thursday 5:00pm-8:00pm

The purpose of this course is to question prevailing, relatively uniform and quite limiting forms of education in light of approaches that escape or overcome these forms. A mode of education is more than mere content and pedagogy. It refers to ways of knowing, forms of life, conceptions of power, value systems, and structuring goals that ultimately underlie a people’s understanding of what education is and does. Therefore, this course concerns more than a simple familiarity with alternative models of learning—rather,...

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EMR 121 Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Eric Henson
Tuesdays, 2:10pm-4:00pm

This field-based research course focuses on some of the major issues that Native American Indian tribes and nations face as the 21st century begins. It provides in-depth, hands-on exposure to native development issues, including: sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, leadership, health and social welfare, land and water rights, culture and language, religious freedom, and education. In particular, the course emphasizes problem definition, client relationships, and designing and completing a research project. The course...

Read more about EMR 121 Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

GENED 1135 Interracial Encounters in American Literature and Culture

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Ju Yon Kim
Tuesday and Thursdays, 1:30 PM - 02:45 PM

From depictions of exchanges in the early colonial Americas to efforts to envision alternate and imminent futures, this class will examine representations of interracial encounters in U.S. American culture. We will explore how various texts and performances have conceived, embodied, and reimagined the relationships not only among differently racialized groups, but also between race and nation, individual and community, and art and politics. Topics addressed in this course will include narratives of indigeneity,...

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HIST 1054: From the Little Ice Age to Climate Change: Introduction to US Environmental History

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Zachary Nowak
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00am-10:15am

What’s the problem with wilderness? Or the environmental movement? Or invasive species?  This course examines how humans thought about and used the natural world over the centuries—and the consequences of both use of and thoughts about the nature. Students will learn about food, climate change, pollution, conquest and resistance, environmentalism, and energy. This course actively seeks to show the importance of the material world and the contributions of a broad spectrum of historical actors to US...

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HIST-LIT 90EA Water Justice and Resistance in the Americas

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

James Mestaz
Tuesday 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

Water is life, but is it a human right? Water governance is a contentious issue globally because humans rely on water for nearly every productive activity; moreover, it is often scarce and not distributed equally. To better understand the persistence and escalation of struggles over water access around the world, this course uses a multidisciplinary approach that allows students to examine both the social and physical shape of water in a modern and historical context. While all bodies of water deserve mention,...

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HISTSCI 123CS Starstruck! The History, Culture, and Politics of American Astronomy

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Sara Schechner
Tuesdays, 3:00pm-5:45pm

This hands-on course will introduce key episodes and issues in the history of American astronomy by close looking at rare early scientific instruments and tangible objects in Harvard collections.  Starting with the story of Captain John Smith, Pocahontas, and a sundial, the course will move from colonial relations with Native Americans to the controversial placement of observatories on sacred mountaintops today.  In between, we will discuss the roles of religion, politics, science, and culture in the...

Read more about HISTSCI 123CS Starstruck! The History, Culture, and Politics of American Astronomy

Reading Course on Muskogee Culture

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Ann Braude

Time: TBD

Initiated by a Muskogee student, this course will be advised by Prof. Ann Braude (Harvard Divinity) and Marcus Briggs-Cloud, HDS 2010. Any student interested in indigenous history and culture of the Southeastern US is welcome. Meeting time to be arranged. Permission of the Instructor required. For further information contact ann_braude@harvard.edu.

 

UPDATE: EMR 133/WGS 1204 Power, Knowledge, Identity: Critical Approaches to Race and Ethnicity: Power, Knowledge, Identity

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Eleanor Craig
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:30am-11:45am

How might critical attention to race and ethnicity as they intersect with gender and sexuality—and also frameworks of indigeneity and class—shape how we study? How do these lenses shift the questions we ask, the information that counts as data, and the genres of work that we recognize as 'academic'?For those newer to studies of race and ethnicity, this course provides intersectional frameworks for recognizing what assumptions undergird academic projects and fields of study. For...

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WOMGEN 1455 Women, Men, and Other Animals

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Mel Chen
Tuesdays, 3:00 PM-5:00 PM

This course explores ways in which human collectives have conceived of other animals, whether in analogical relations for scientific research, exploitative relations for food and labor, affective relations like fear, disgust, love. What are some histories of these unique interdependencies between human animals and nonhuman animals? We will critically explore the relentless and yet slippery divisions between humans and nonhuman animals, seeing them as a falsely singular, conflictual and segregatory divide that has played...

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❖ ANTHRO 1082 Moundbuilders, Birdmen, and Earth Monsters: The Archaeology of Eastern North America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Robert Cook
Wednesdays, 9:00am-11:45am

This course introduces the archaeological study of the ancient societies of eastern North America, with a focus on the Ohio River Valley region, the first frontier of the United States. We will explore inter-related aspects of religion, economy, technology, and human biology associated with the span of time ranging from the first arrival of humans to the European invasion of the continent. The emphasis is on key forms and changes in social organization associated with shifts between foraging and farming, the...

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Fall 2019

AFVS197K: Cinemas of Resistance: Political Filmmaking Across the Globe

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Katherine Rennebohm
Fall 2019, Wednesday, 3-5:45pm

Can film change the world? What can the history of engaged film and media-making teach us about politics, and vice-versa? This course will study instances of political filmmaking from around the world: early 20th century avant-garde filmmaking, anti-colonialist and anti-imperialist cinemas, feminist and queer filmmaking, Indigenous cinemas, and more. Students will learn about different political movements, international histories of film theory and film form, and the ongoing legacies of cinemas of...

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ANTH1900: Counseling as Colonization? Native American Encounters with the Clinical Psy-ences

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Joseph Gone
Fall 2019, Mondays, 12:00pm-2:45pm 

American Indian, First Nations, and other Indigenous communities of the USA and Canada contend with disproportionately high rates of “psychiatric” distress. Many of these communities attribute this distress to their long colonial encounters with European settlers. Concurrently, throughout the 20th century, the disciplines and professions associated with mind, brain, and behavior (e.g., psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis) consolidated their authority and influence within mainstream society. These “psy-...

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ANTHRO1190: The Invasion of America: The Anthropology of American Encounters, 1492-1830

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Matt Liebmann
Fall 2019, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00-1:15pm

In 1492 Native Americans discovered Europeans, changing the world forever. The European invasion of the Americas triggered demographic, economic, and ecological changes on an unprecedented scale. The subsequent movement of plants, animals, and goods prompted global shifts in population, exploitation of resources, and the transformation of environments on both sides of the Atlantic. What can archaeology tell us about early encounters between Native Americans and Europeans? Why did the European...

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DPI391: Race, Inequality, and American Democracy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Megan Francis
Fall 2019, Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:15-2:30pm

The United States’ global dominance has long been the envy of the world. But the role of race to native born and newcomer alike has been treated often as aberrational, an unfortunate artifact of the nation’s past. This course examines the nature of race at the heart of the American project through the lens of wealth creation, labor markets, political culture, social institutions, immigration and civic life. Although race often attaches to people of color, racial identity and ideology have been...

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ENGLISH282A: Ethnic Studies: Past, Present Future

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Ju Yon Kim
Fall 2019, Tuesdays, 9:45-11:45am

An interdisciplinary graduate research seminar exploring cutting-edge approaches in ethnic studies. From its institutional beginnings in the late-1960s, the field of ethnic studies built frameworks to critically examine questions of inequality and power through intersecting analytical paradigms of race, indigeneity, gender, sexuality, class, and citizenship. With visiting scholars at Harvard’s Warren Center, students will explore how such frameworks remain useful and relevant, interrogate limitations and...

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FRSEMR631: The First Americans: Portraits of Indigenous Power and Diplomacy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Shawon Kinew
Fall 2019, Friday, 12-2:45pm

Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is home to 25 oil portraits of indigenous American leaders painted in the first half of the 19th century. Originally commissioned to preserve cultures an American bureaucrat feared would be extinct, these paintings transcend a moribund history. In fact, the Native American nations represented are still here. Moreover, these portraits have much to teach us about diplomacy, power, representation and indigeneity in 2019. The Peabody portraits, painted by the...

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HIST-LIT90DJ: From Wounded Knee to Standing Rock: Native America in the Twentieth Century

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Christopher Clements
Fall 2019, Mondays, 9:45-11:45am

This course will explore various forms of Native American cultural and political production in the twentieth century. Drawing on fiction, film, historical documents, documentaries, photographs, nonfiction, and memoirs, this class will explore the ways in which Indigenous people have articulated both belonging and separateness from the United States. In addition to its focus on key aspects of modern indigenous culture and politics—sovereignty, self-determination, decolonization, anti-racism, gender...

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HIST14M: “Black Indians”: The Making of an Identity

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Tiya Miles
Fall 2019, Wednesday, 12-2pm

This seminar will explore intersections in African American and Native American histories with an emphasis on pivotal moments in the shaping of a modern identity referred to as “Black Indian.” Students in this seminar will explore and analyze historical contexts and contingencies leading to thick interactions between people of African descent and indigenous Americans as well as experiential testimony by individuals asserting mixed race and/or bi-cultural Afro-Native identities. During our time together, students will...

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HL90DX: Environmental Justice in North America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Arianne Sedef Urus
Fall 2019, Wednesdays, 9:45 – 11:45am

This course examines how the right to natural resources became contested in North America following European conquest and westward expansion, with a particular emphasis on the period before 1865. Sometimes these contested resources have been clean air, soil, and water, while at other times they included fisheries, forests, agricultural fields, animal pastures, or oil. From when pilgrims first arrived at Plymouth Rock in 1620, race, class, and gender have been the determining factors in regulating...

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RELIGION1519: Issues in the Studies of Native American Religion

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Anne Braude
Fall 2019, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:30-11:45am

Based around a series of traditionalist guest speakers, this course interrogates the study of religion in general and of Native American traditions in particular in light of indigenous religious experiences, perspectives and histories. Questions of appropriation, repatriation and religious freedom will be approached through legal as well as cultural frameworks.