Courses

Starting in Fall 2020, the courses listed below are organized into three categories.

HUNAP Faculty - Courses are taught by members of HUNAP’s faculty board and cover Native & Indigenous topics in a direct fashion, or through units/readings.

Indigenous Focused - Courses taught by members of the general faculty at Harvard and cover Indigenous topics as their primary focus.

Indigenous Units/Readings Featured - Courses taught by the general faculty and may have components of their course related to Indigenous topics. 

List of Courses - Fall 2022, HUNAP Faculty

GENED 1148: Moctezuma's Mexico Then and Now: The Past, the Present and Pandemics in North America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professors: David L. Carrasco and William Fash

M, W - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

How does Mexico's rich cultural past shape contemporary Mexico and the US in the face of today's pandemics, protests and other challenges of the borderlands?

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore how the study of pre-Hispanic and Colonial Mexican and Latina/o cultures provide vital context for understanding today's changing world. The emphasis is on the mythical and social origins, glory days and political collapse of the Aztec...

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HDS 2052: Religion and Liberation Around Toni Morrison and Gabriel García Márquez: Writings and Lives

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: David L. Carrasco

T - 12:00 pm to 1:59 pm

 1995 Toni Morrison and Gabriel García Márquez met for the first time in Mexico City and spoke about their writings, editors, lives and literary influences. This course is a comparative study of the religious dimensions in their writings and lives with special attention to the themes of colonialism and liberation, homeland and quests,  rememory and myths, Africa and Latin America,  goodness and evil, slavery and freedom.  More attention will be given to Morrison’s works and García...

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HIST 1006: Native American and Indigenous Studies: An Introduction

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professors: Philip J. Deloria and Laura Johnson

M, W - 12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

Though American Indian people make up 1.7% of the U.S. population, their importance outweighs the census numbers.  Native American history and politics define critical issues in law, energy, land management, and government, while the culture industries inevitably confront the curious hold that indigenous people have on American culture.  American conquest and colonialism invite connection and comparison across a global scale, particularly in settler states such as Canada, Australia...

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HIST 15H / ENGLISH 90LN: Harvard and Native Lands

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professors: Philip J. Deloria and Alan Niles

T - 9:45 am to 11:45 pm

Harvard’s beginnings included a promise to educate both “English and Indian youth,” but from its outset Harvard’s endowment included Native lands expropriated through war, theft, and coercion. This class will conduct original research on these histories, seeking to contribute a new understanding of Harvard’s institutional development and its historic and continuing impact on Native American peoples. We will work hands-on with Harvard’s archives, developing research skills in navigating...

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HIST 1945: Slavery and Public History

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Tiya Miles

T - 12:45 pm to 2:45 pm

Confronting vexed historical meanings and present-day uses of the past is the special charge of public historians. This course explores the theme of slavery through the lenses and methods of public history, a field of historical inquiry and applied knowledge production that stresses past-present connections, community engagement, collaborative work, and audiences beyond the academy. As a foundational element in the structure of U.S. society, slavery has made a lasting imprint on social, cultural, political, and...

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RELIGION 1590: Issues in the Study of Native American Religion

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Ann Braude

T, Th - 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Based around a series of traditionalist guest speakers, this course interrogates the study of religion in general and of Native American traditions in particular in light of indigenous religious experiences, perspectives and histories. Questions of appropriation, repatriation and religious freedom will be approached through legal as well as cultural frameworks.

List of Courses - Fall 2022, Indigenous Focused

EMR 151: Quechua, Indigenous language revitalization and Global Indigeneity

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Americo Mendoza-Mori

M, W - 3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Are Indigenous languages and cultures a thing of the past? Although Indigenous peoples make up less than 6% of the global population, they speak more than 4,000 of the world’s approximately 6,700 languages. At the same time, the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues indicates that two Indigenous languages die every two months. Indigenous Language reclamation is crucial to the identity and resistance efforts of many communities: additionally, this process contributes to the...

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HAA 197P: Introduction to Pre-Columbian America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Thomas Cummins

M, 12:45 pm to 2:45 pm (REMOTE)

This is a general introduction to and survey of the arts of Ancient America.  We will look at both Mesoamerica and the Andean art and architecture beginning with some of the earliest cultures and ending with Aztec, Maya, Muisca and Inca.  Questions about the materials, urban planning,meaning and aesthetics will be addressed.  The course will also take advantage of the great collections at the Peabody Museum as well as the MFA.  There are no prerequisites.

 

HIST-LIT 90FL: Indigenous in the City

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Morgan Ridgway

M - 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

According to census data, nearly seven out of every ten Indigenous people live in or near cities. Despite this number, a prevailing narrative locates the Indigenous person some place far away from urban life. While the reservation and rural areas are critically important in Indigenous histories, presents, and futures, cities provide another lens through which to understand Indigenous life in the United States. Given the sheer numbers of Indigenous people in cities, why is the prevailing narrative one of...

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RELIGION 1589: Truths & Reconciliations

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Pamela Klassen

T - 9:00 am to 11:45 am

What responsibility do later generations have to remember and atone for the injustices of the past, even as they are perpetuated in the present? This course focuses on how projects of national public memory—especially commissions of “Truth and Reconciliation”—grapple with the demands of the past as they are experienced, ignored, and/or re-narrated by successive generations. Our class discussions will be oriented by readings from the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, which...

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SPANSH 147: Decolonial Views, Decolonial Practices: Indigeneity and Protest in the Caribbean

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Jorge Sanches Cruz

T, Th - 1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

This course explores the afterlife of colonialism. Students will be introduced to critical terms and practices that contour the decolonial turn, such as dispossession, displacement, and deterritorialization, as well as gestures of resistance, protest, and rebellion; at the same time, the course is designed to expose students to theoretical interventions, literary productions, and cultural practices that have shaped the field of decolonial thought.

Conducted in Spanish.

SPANSH 167: Queer Indigeneity: North and South Conversations

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Jorge Sanchez Cruz

T, Th - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

This course explores the intersections of indigeneity and queerness, how they manifest in Latin American and North American literature, poetics, culture, and theory, and how they potentiate a North and South conversation regarding patriarchy, colonialism, and dispossession.

Taught in English, Spanish Proficiency is Required.

List of Courses - Fall 2022, Indigenous Readings/Units

AFRAMER 181X: African Religion in the Diaspora

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Jacob Olupona

W - 9:00 am to 11:45 am

This course focuses on the history and phenomenology of African peoples’ religious experiences in the Americas. The historical and social processes that led to the emergence of African diasporic religions in Latin America and the Caribbean will form the core of our reading materials. We will examine the role of myth, ritual, arts, and symbols as well as the social and political processes that explain the evolution of Black Atlantic religious traditions as formed by African indigenous traditions, African Christianity,...

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DPI 385M A: Race and Racism in the Making of the United States as a Global Power

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Khalil Muhammad

T, Th - 12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

This course is a core requirement for all MPP students. No other students are allowed to enroll at this time. The course is in response to longstanding efforts by HKS students, and most recently, the HKS Equity Coalition, to insist that understanding race and racism and their intersecting forms of power and oppression is essential to an excellent education at a policy school. The United States’ global dominance has long been the envy of the world. But the role of race to native born and newcomer alike has often...

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DPI 464: Latin American Contemporary Political Economy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Sebastián Etchemendy

M, W - 1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Since the last quarter of the XXth century Latin America has lived under the shadow of two parallel, sweeping (and often contradictory) processes: democratization and economic liberalization. These massive shifts have posed enormous challenges to established political actors such as electoral and patronage-based parties, as well as to economic actors such as domestic business and the labor movement. In this context, traditional stakeholders (protected industrial business, populist parties and mainstream...

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EMR 1010: Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Americo Mendoza-Mori

M, W - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

This course is intended to provide hands-on practice toward doing research on Latinx issues, with an approach grounded in the understanding that terms ‘Hispanic’ and ‘Latinidad’ are not static concepts and, at the same time, not a homogeneous mix. We will examine culture, intellectual production, languages, economics, and political thought, as well as the dynamics of Latino/a/e people in the United States. Throughout the class, students will become familiar with a wide range of thinkers, currents, concepts...

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ENGLISH 90DR: Digital Race Studies: Storytelling, Power, Community

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Maria Dikcis

Th - 12:45 pm to 2:45 pm

This course will introduce students to critical race approaches to digital culture, primarily through Asian American, Black, Indigenous, and Latinx perspectives on and experiences with settler colonialism, racial capitalism, state violence, war, and empire. Together, we will explore how racial formations in the U.S. have shaped and been shaped by the infrastructures and interfaces of our digital world, as well as how communities of color give voice to their histories, desires, and creativity through digital...

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GENED 1019: The Caribbean Crucible: Colonialism, Capitalism and Post-Colonial Misdevelopment In The Region

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Orlando Patterson

T, Th - 1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

 

How does the growing inequality between and within nations—which is the major global issue of our times—impact the Caribbean region and, in turn, its U.S. neighbor?

This course explores the complex, formative role of the Caribbean in the development of Western colonialism and capitalism and the consequences for the peoples of the region. Four major themes will be examined. First, the importance of the region in the origin and early development of Western imperialism...

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GENED 1071: African Spirituality and the Challenges of Modern Times

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Jacob Olupona

T, Th - 12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

What can African spiritual traditions contribute to human flourishing in the contemporary age?

Taking the Marvel blockbuster Black Panther as a starting point, the course will explore the African spiritual heritage both on the continent and the diaspora communities (Black Atlantic diasporas). We will begin by spelling out the features of African indigenous religious traditions: cosmology, cosmogony, mythology, ritual practices, divination, healing ceremonies,...

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GENED 1089: The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Gabriela Soto Laveaga

T, Th - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

What can histories of tension and cooperation at the U.S.-Mexico border tell us about our own nation's public health programs and national racism?

Why does the Mexico-U.S. border continue to be a space for debate and controversy? This course examines how the creation of the U.S.-Mexico border in 1848 shaped modern Mexican society from the nineteenth century to our present. For many, the border served (and serves) as a protective barrier from poverty, violence, and,...

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HDS 3078: When the Orishas Trouble Gender: An Exploration of Decolonial and Nonbinary Feminist Methods

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Xhercis Mendez

M - 12:00 pm - 1:59 pm

Are binary conceptions of the human and the body presupposed when we perform gender analyses? This course examines the usefulness of gender as a cross-cultural category of analysis from the standpoint of Afrolatine/diasporic religions and non-western ritual practices such as Afrocuban Santería, Winti, Yoruba, Ifá, Native American, and Mesoamerican indigenous practices - practices that trouble canonized approaches to gender research and knowledge production. Should practices like altar-building, initiation, and...

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HDS 3166: Ecotheology

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Dan McKanan

M, W - 9:00 am to 10:15 am

This course will survey constructive religious reflection that is informed by an ecological worldview and accountable to various forms of environmental activism. Readings will be drawn from a variety of religious and spiritual traditions, among them Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Paganism, religious naturalism, and Indigenous spirituality. We will pay special attention to the interplay between ecotheology and various theologies of liberation. Students will be invited to develop their own constructive...

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HDS 3300: Religious Literacy and the Professions

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Diane Moore

T, Th - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

Religions have functioned throughout human history to inspire and justify the full range of human agency from the heinous to the heroic. Their influences remain potent here in the 21st century in spite of modern predictions that religious influences would steadily decline in concert with the rise of secular democracies and advances in science. Professionals in a wide range of fields need to understand these complex religious influences in order to understand modern human affairs across the full spectrum of...

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HIS 4495: Highways, Deforestation, and State-driven Colonization in Amazonia

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Ana Duran

M - 1:30 pm to 4:15 pm

 

Climate change has placed Amazonia at the center stage of global socio-environmental consciousness, particularly after the fires of 2019, which revealed the continental scale of land grabbing and deforestation in the region. Highways and paved roads have spearheaded the expansion of resource frontiers. They have also served as conduits for a complex process of state-driven colonization/urbanization which would more accurately be described as a favelization or entropic occupation of the rainforest. In this...

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HIST 15M: Disability in American History

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Madeline Williams

T - 3:00 pm to 5:45 pm

This course explores disability as a crucial aspect of power and identity in modern American history. Over the course of that history, debilitating and maiming forces have produced impairment in the bodies and minds of groups and individuals in unequal ways. In this course we consider some of these forces, from indigenous dispossession and slavery to industrialization, war, social responses to disparities in state support or to state-supported violence, and environmental degradation. Through applying a...

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HIST-LIT 90FO: Pacific Worlds

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Rebecca Hogue

W - 12:45 pm to 2:45 pm

This course examines the Pacific, not as an object of exploration, but as an agent of oceanic relations. We will begin with the ancestral connections between Pacific Islands, travel through the 18th and 19th centuries as we interrogate the entanglements of European imperialism and native Pacific sovereignty, through to the role of the Pacific in World War II and the Cold War, before landing in the 21st century and the modern Indigenous Oceanic connections of environmental movements. Inspired by Banaban-scholar/...

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HIST-LIT 90FP: Atlantic Narratives and the Making of the Modern World

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Alison Glassie

Th - 9:45 am to 11:45 am

How has the ocean made the modern world? This course asks how stories of the Atlantic intersect with larger threads of world history such as empire, enslavement, and Indigenous dispossession. Mindful that the very word oceanography combines the Greek words for ocean and writing, we’ll investigate how biophysical conditions mediate cultural, historical, and even economic experience. How did Atlantic currents, prevailing winds, and fisheries facilitate the development of racial capitalism? And how do we write and...

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HIST-LIT 90FT: A Luta Continua: Legacies of Portuguese Empire

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Lilly Havstad

W - 9:45 am to 11:00 am

As a central player in the history of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and widely known as the last of the European powers to let go of its grip on its African territories in 1975, Portugal earned a reputation as one of the most violent imperial powers in modern world history. Over 500 years, tactics of violence and coercion were key tools for building its empire across Asia, the Americas, and Africa, particularly for the purpose of enslavement and recruitment of forced indigenous labor, and to establish colonial "order...

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HIST-LIT 90FX: Imagining Latin America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Jennifer Alpert

W - 12:45 pm to 2:45 pm

“Latin America” refers to a geographical region, a culture, a form of racialization, a mode of being, and even a concept. How have these different characterizations imagined Latin America and its diaspora, and what kinds of myths and discourses emerged as a result? How have these imaginaries constructed Latin America as a homogeneous, cohesive whole, and to what effect? What do these representations erase, especially considering the heterogeneous cultural and linguistic traditions in the region? Throughout the...

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MUSIC 160R: Composition Seminar: Working with Words

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Th - 9:45 am to 11:45 am

 

This course will explore how literary and other textual sources can provide the creative stimulus for original vocal and instrumental composition. From popular music to experimental contemporary music, how is it that the integration of words and music can achieve an expressive affect that is greater than the sum of the parts? Likewise, how can the concepts and sounds of a text influence and even determine the creative character of an instrumental composition?

In answering these questions, and by way of establishing...

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Spring 2022 - HUNAP Faculty

ANTHRO 1190: American Invasions: Archaeological Tales of Encounter, Exploration, and Colonization, 1492-1830

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor, Matt Liebmann

Monday, Wednesday 3:00-4:15pm

Course Site

In 1492 Native Americans discovered Europeans, changing the world forever.  The European invasion of the Americas triggered demographic, economic, and ecological changes on an unprecedented scale.  The subsequent movement of people, plants, animals, and goods prompted global shifts in population, exploitation of resources, and the...

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ANTHRO 1475: Religious Dimensions in Human Experience: Apocalypse, Home, Medicine, Music, Sports, Sacrifice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor, David L. Carrasco

Monday, Wednesday 10:30-11:45am


Course Site

What is Religion? Why does it show up everywhere? Using archaeology, religious studies and social thought, this course will study the major themes in the history of religions including ‘encountering the holy’, 'sports and ritual’, ‘crossing borders’, ‘sacrifice as creation’, ‘pilgrimage and sacred place’, ‘suffering and quest for wisdom’, ‘...

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GENED 1032: Res Publica: A History of Representative Government

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Daniel Carpenter

Monday, Wednesday 3:00pm-4:15pm

Course Site

“A republic, if you can keep it.” So did Benjamin Franklin characterize his hopes for American government. What did Franklin and others mean by republic, and why did he and so many others worry that it might be something hard to hold onto...

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HIST-LIT 10: Introduction to American Studies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor, Philip Deloria

Monday, Wednesday 10:30-11:45am

Course Site

American Studies is an interdisciplinary effort to understand the complicated social and cultural lives of people in—and in relation to—the United States, both past and present. The intersections of History and Literature shape much of American Studies, but the field has also been marked by forays into music, arts, ethnic studies, economics,...

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Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building I

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor Joe Kalt

J-Term Course

Jan 1 - 22, 10 am - 4:30 pm

Course Site

This course examines the challenges that contemporary Native American tribes and nations face as they endeavor to rebuild their communities, strengthen their cultures, and support their citizens. The range of issues that Native leaders and policymakers confront is wide and...

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Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor Eric Henson

Friday, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

Course Site

This community based research course focuses on some of the major issues Native American Indian tribes and nations face in the 21st century. It provides in-depth, hands-on exposure to native development issues, including: sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, leadership, health and...

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SUP 625: Land Loss, Reclamation, and Stewardship in Contemporary Native America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professors, Eric Henson, Daniel D'Oca, & Philip Deloria

Tuesday 10:30am-1:15pm

Course Site

This course will explore three critical dimensions in American Indian land issues: historical land loss, contemporary tribal governmental efforts at land reclamation, stewardship, and co-management.  We will begin by tracking the history of land dispossession from colonial settlement to the present day.  We...

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Spring 2022 - Indigenous Focused

STU 1408: OTTAWA COUNTY REMADE: Toxic Transformations in the Tri-State Lead and Zinc District, Oklahoma

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Niall Kirkwood

Tuesday & Thursday 2:00-6:00pm

Course Site

OTTAWA COUNTY REMADE is the second in a series of design studios based in North-East Oklahoma that explores toxic land regeneration, indigenous ecologies and their combined agency in creating environmental and social equity using...

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EMR 1020: Topics in Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Studies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Eleanor Craig

Tuesday 12:00-2:45pm

Course Site

Topics in AAPI Studies is an interdisciplinary introductory level course. It will focus on converging and diverging aspects of Asian American and Pacific Islander histories and experiences through historical, theoretical, and cultural lenses....

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EMR 148: Indigeneity and Latinidad

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Americo Mendoza-Mori

Wednesday 3:00-5:45pm

Course Site

 

As the original inhabitants of the Americas, Indigenous communities resist and thrive across the hemisphere, despite the dynamics of colonization that still affect their existence and way of living. Many prejudices...

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WOMGEN 1292: Indigenous Feminisms: Environmental Justice and Resistance

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Rebecca Hogue

Thursday, 12:00-2:30pm

Course Site

This course will introduce key concepts, methodologies, and arts from Indigenous feminist perspectives on environmental justice. To do this, we will examine five 21st century Indigenous environmental justice case studies from Turtle...

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Spring 2022 - Indigenous Readings/Units

EXPOS 20 208: Expository Writing 20: Wastelands

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Collier Brown

Tuesday & Thursday 9:00-10:15am

Course Site

 

Representations of wastelands in literature typically revolve around ideas of emptiness, desolation, and depravity. But is any land ever really empty? Think of colonization. Entire continents have been declared vacant...

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GENED 1159: American Capitalism

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Sven Beckert

Tuesday & Thursday 12:00-1:15pm

Course Site

How did capitalism emerge, expand and transform daily life in North America over the past 500 years? In this course, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how North America turned from a minor outpost of the Atlantic economy...

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AFRAMER 109Y: Social Justice and the Documentary Film

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Vivek Bald

Thursday 12:45-2:45pm

Course Site

In this course, students will watch, analyze, discuss and write about a series of documentary films tied to movements for social justice; they will also work in teams over the course of the semester to produce their own short issue-based documentaries...

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ENGLISH 190VE: Voices of Environmental Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Sarah Dimick

Monday & Wednesday 3:00-4:15pm

Course Site

 

This course considers the relationships between systems of human injustice and environmental
issues—including industrial disasters, ocean acidification, and resource extraction. We examine...

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IGA 455: Environmental Politics: Persuasion, Advocacy and Negotiation

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Rand Wentworth

Monday & Wednesday 4:30-5:45pm

Course Site

 

The world is on fire. Smoke darkens the sky. Scorching heat. Violent storms. Mass extinction.

In this perilous moment in human history, the world desperately needs leaders with the courage, drive and...

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EXPOS 20 225: Expository Writing 20: Domestic Labor

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Courtney Miller

Monday & Wednesday 10:30-11:45am

Course Site

Domestic work, according to labor activist Ai-jen Poo, is “the work that makes all other work possible,” yet the people who clean, cook, and care are so often invisible and undervalued. Because domestic labor takes place within the...

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FRSEMR 22T: Why We Animals Sing

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Brian Farrell

Thursday 9:45-11:45am

Course Site

 

We do not sing alone. On land, four kinds of animals produce songs or calls: birds, frogs, mammals and insects. Some of these (and fish) also do so underwater.  The principal sounds such animal species make are signaling...

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AFRAMER 20: Introduction to African Languages and Cultures

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  John Mugane

Monday & Wednesday 10:30-11:45am

Course Site

 

This course is an introduction to Africans through African languages and cultures. The course explores how sub-Saharan Africans use language and cultural production to understand, organize, and transmit indigenous...

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GENED 1089: The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor, Gabriela Soto Laveaga

Monday. & Wednesday 10:30-11:45am

Course Site

Why does the Mexico-U.S. border continue to be a space for debate and controversy? This course examines how the creation of the U.S.-Mexico border in 1848 shaped modern Mexican society from the nineteenth century to our present. For many, the border served (and serves) as a protective barrier from poverty, violence, and,...

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HIST-LIT 90FH: Witchcraft and Magic in the Atlantic World

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Arianne Urus

Tuesday 3:00-5:00pm

Course Site

Magic had long been an integral part of how people made sense of the world around them, but between 1450 and 1750 some 80 to 100,000 people (mostly women) were executed under charges of witchcraft in western Europe alone. During the same period, a...

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WOMGEN 1495: Feminist Ecologies and Economies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Katherine Gibson

Wednesday 3:00-5:45pm

Course Site

Why is it easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism? As we witness the effects of global warming, species loss, economic inequality, and gendered and racialized violence, it is indeed hard to imagine that...

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Fall 2021 - HUNAP Faculty

HIST 2006: Readings in Native American and Indigenous Studies: Seminar

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Professor Philip Deloria

Wednesday, 12:45 pm - 2:45 pm

Course Site

This course offers a survey of the historiography of Native American and Indigenous Studies.  Centered on six themes—Power and the Middle Ground, Borderlands, Settler Colonialism and Sovereignty, Race and Slavery, Modernity and Futurity, and Global and Comparative Indigeneity—the...

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Fall 2021 - Indigenous Focused

ANTHRO 1182: People of the Sun: The Archaeology of Ancient Mexico

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Professor, Dr. Jennifer Carballo

Monday, Wednesday 12-1:15pm

Course Site

This course provides a broad overview of the archaeology of ancient Mexico and Central America, focusing on the Indigenous cultures of highland Mexico such as the Aztecs and Zapotecs, as well as their predecessors and contemporary descendants. Anthropology 1182 is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding and appreciation...

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ENGLISH 90HP: Harvard and the Puritans in Native America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Professor Alan Niles

Wednesday 09:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Course Site

Harvard’s still governing 1650 charter states the institution’s mission is “the education of English and Indian youth.” What were the ideas about race, culture, and colonialism that made such an idea possible? What was life like for the early Native American students who studied at Harvard, and what happened to the founding idea of a multiracial...

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SPANSH 147: Decolonial Views, Decolonial Practices: Indigeneity and Protest in Latin America and the Caribbean

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Course Site

The resignation of Ricardo Rosselló—former governor of Puerto Rico— in 2019 was in due in part, but not exclusively, to the Colectivo Feminista en Construcción and its tactics of Black feminist decolonial methodologies. This course investigates the ruptures and interruptions of decoloniality, as theory and as praxis, deployed by non-indigenous and indigenous peoples. We aim to understand the nuances and problematizations that...

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EDU T002: Critical Race Theory in Education

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Semester: Fall

Offered: 2021

This course focuses on the epistemological, methodological, and pedagogical uses of critical race theory (CRT) in the examination and deconstruction of race-based educational disparities and inequalities in K-12 and postsecondary education. The overarching goals of the course will be to examine the utility of CRT as a theoretical framework in (1) interrogating the factors that cause racial educational disparities; (2) exploring why inequalities exist and persist; and (3) determining sustainable remedies to these disparities and...

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Fall 2021 - Indigenous Reading/Units

EMR 1010: Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Professor Americo Mendoza-Mori

Mon & Wed, 12 pm - 1:15 pm

Course Site

This course is intended to provide hands-on practice toward doing research on Latinx issues, with an approach grounded in the understanding that terms ‘Hispanic’ and ‘Latinidad’ are not static concepts and, at the same time, not a homogeneous mix. We will examine culture,...

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GENED 1019: The Caribbean Crucible: Colonialism, Capitalism and Post-Colonial Misdevelopment In The Region

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Professor Orlando Patterson

Tues & Thurs, 12 pm - 1:15 pm

Course Site

This course explores the complex, formative role of the Caribbean in the development of Western colonialism and capitalism and the consequences for the peoples of the region. Four major themes will be examined. First, the importance of the region in the origin and early...

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HIST 13C: St. Louis from Lewis and Clark to Michael Brown

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Professor Walter Johnson

Course Site

St. Louis was the epicenter of American empire in the nineteenth century: the point of embarkation for Lewis and Clark; the military headquarters for U.S. Indian wars.   It was likewise central to the history of slavery: from the Missouri Compromise to Dred Scott.  The city’s intertwining of the history of...

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Spring 2021 - HUNAP Faculty

DEV 501M Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building I

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Joe Kalt
January Term, 1/12, 1/13, 1/14, 1/15

This course examines the challenges that contemporary Native American tribes and nations face as they endeavor to rebuild their communities, strengthen their cultures, and support their citizens. The range of issues that Native leaders and policymakers confront is wide and encompass political sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, cultural promotion, land and water rights, religious freedom, health and social welfare, and education. Because the challenges are broad and comprehensive, the course emphasizes the...

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GOV 1338 Institutional Development in Native America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Dan Carpenter
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

Examines the challenges and strategies of advocacy, sovereignty building and institutional development among Native Nations in the U.S.  Includes engaged scholarship working with Native Nations on these issues.

HIST 1015 Native American Women: History and Myth

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Tiya Miles
Teaching Fellow: Sarah Sadlier
Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM ET

This combined lecture/discussion course explores histories of women from diverse Indigenous nations within the current boundaries of the United States. The course traces multiple themes that intersect Native women’s lives: concepts of family and intimate relationships; spiritual understandings and notions of tradition; gender roles and cross-cultural gender difference; processes and kinds of colonialism, conceptions of land and effects of land dispossession; cultural negotiation, change, and...

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HIST 97P "What is Indigenous History?"

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Phil Deloria
Sophomore Tutorial, History Department
Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM ET

What is it to be Indigenous?  Is indigeneity a contemporary political formation, the product of centuries of colonial and imperial incursions into the lands of others?  Is it an aboriginal, autochthonous presence that has existed from ancient time, with a continuity based on both survival and self-possession?  Or something else entirely?  While many first peoples prefer culturally specific identities over the general term indigenous, others embrace Indigeneity...

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Spring 2021 - Indigenous Focused Courses

ANTHRO 1490 Something Else: Material Revolutions in Indigenous Activism

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2021

Zoe Eddy
Tuesdays, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET

 

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of how North American Indigenous communities, particularly women and two-spirit people, navigate activist movements through material culture and media. We will examine Indigenous material culture across various timelines and focus specifically on trajectories of objects of resistance. Students will learn how to approach material objects from a historical perspective as well as how to consider these objects in their current cultural context. In addition to...

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DEV 502 Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2021

Eric Henson
Tuesdays, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM ET

This community based research course focuses on some of the major issues Native American Indian tribes and nations face in the 21st century. It provides in-depth, hands-on exposure to native development issues, including: sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, leadership, health and social welfare, tribal finances, land and water rights, culture and language, religious freedom, and education. In particular, the course emphasizes problem definition, client relationships, and designing and completing a research...

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EMR 145 Latinx Xicanx Indigeneities

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Marcelo Garzo
Wednesdays, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET

In this advanced seminar course, we will explore questions of indigeneity and decolonization in Latinx and Xicanx communities and diasporas across Abya Yala (the Americas, including the Caribbean). Thinking from the intersections of Latinx/Xicanx and Native/Indigenous Studies and communities — and through a comparative and critical Ethnic Studies lens — we will trace key terms and concepts that emerge from these important transdisciplinary fields, social movements and debates. How does indigeneity relate to concepts such as...

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Spring 2021 - Courses with Indigenous Topics and Readings

ENG 190EV Voices of Environmental Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Sarah Dimick
Mondays/Wednesdays, 3:00 PM - 4:15 PM ET

This course considers the relationships between systems of human injustice and environmental issues—including industrial disasters, ocean acidification, and resource extraction. We examine environmental justice writing and artwork with a transnational, interconnected approach. For example, we ask how the Ogoni activist Ken Saro-Wiwa’s writing on oil pipelines in the Niger Delta anticipates Native American protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline. We draw connections between a poem documenting...

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EXPOS 20 204 Wastelands

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Collier Brown
Undergraduate Seminar
Dates/Time: TBA

The impenetrable wilderness of The Revenant, the diseased streets of Children of Men, the trash heap cities of Wall-E—these are the wastelands that fascinate our pop culture. On the screen, they come to life as horrifying alternate universes and dead civilizations—the very fates we must avoid at all costs. And yet wastelands are not exclusively the stuff of science fiction. In this course, we will grapple with both imaginary and actual wastelands. We will begin with short...

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GENED 1089 The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021
Why does the Mexico-U.S. border continue to be a space for debate and controversy? This course examines how the creation of the U.S.-Mexico border in 1848 shaped modern Mexican society from the nineteenth century to our present. For many, the border served (and serves) as a protective barrier from poverty, violence, and, especially, disease. By the early twentieth century many Mexican bodies were perceived as “alien,” “illegal,” and in need of patrolling. Yet these descriptions were also used by Mexican politicians to describe and isolate groups such as Indigenous and Chinese within... Read more about GENED 1089 The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

GENED 1159 American Capitalism

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Sven Beckert
Tuesdays/Thursdays/ 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

How did capitalism emerge, expand and transform daily life in North America over the past 500 years? In this course, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how North America turned from a minor outpost of the Atlantic economy into the powerhouse of the world economy, how Americans built a capitalist economy and how that capitalism, in turn, changed every aspect of their lives.  In the process, they will come to understand how contemporary capitalism is the result of centuries of human engagement, struggle...

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GOV 94MK The Politics of Land, Resources, and Colonialism in North America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Katie Mazer
Dates/Times: TBA

This course examines the colonial basis of the continental political economy of the United States and Canada, which has long been understood as the United States’ main resource hinterland. It offers students a range of analytical tools through which to understand contemporary contestation over land and resources in both countries. Drawing on writings by political scientists, geographers, anthropologists, and historians, the course moves between theories of nature and settler colonialism; Indigenous perspectives that transcend and exceed...

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HIST 1636 Intro to Harvard History: Beyond the Three Lies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Zach Nowak
Mondays/Wednesdays, 7:30 PM - 8:45 PM ET

Harvard’s history is a story of professors, students, courses, and research that has led to world-changing innovations. But it is also a story of student unrest, gender unease, and the exclusion of women and minorities, enslaved people, Native Americans, and working-class people. All of them made Harvard and left traces in its archives, libraries, and museums, its buildings, and even in its soil. Some Harvard stories have been told; others have been forgotten. In this class, we will uncover Harvard’s past...

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HIST-LIT 90ES Prison Abolition

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Thomas Dichter
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

Is prison abolition a serious proposal, an aspirational ideal, a trendy slogan, or a blueprint for social transformation? This interdisciplinary and community-engaged course situates the prison abolition movement in deep historical context and explores its current relation to the politics of criminal justice reform. We will study the movement’s connections to slavery abolitionism, anti-lynching activism, Indigenous struggles for sovereignty, and the Black Power movement. We will examine the emergence...

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HISTSCI 123CS Starstruck! The History, Culture, and Politics of American Astronomy

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2021

Sara Schechner
Tuesdays, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET

This hands-on course will introduce key episodes and issues in the history of American astronomy by close looking at rare early scientific instruments and tangible objects in Harvard collections.  Starting with the story of Captain John Smith, Pocahontas, and a sundial, the course will move from colonial relations with Native Americans to the controversial placement of observatories on sacred mountaintops today.  In between, we will discuss the roles of religion, politics, science, and culture in the...

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HLS 2033 Conflict of Laws

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2021

Joseph Singer, HUNAP Faculty Member
Open to Upper Level JD students
Mondays/Tuesdays, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

 

This course examines how courts choose which law should be applied to transactions, relationships, or occurrences having contacts with more than one state in the United States, or with a state in the United States and a foreign nation. The course will also touch on adjudicatory jurisdiction, recognition of foreign judgments, and tribal sovereignty of American Indian nations. We will address the various approaches adopted by states and...

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IGA 105 International Law and Global Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Kathryn Sinkkink
Mondays/Wednesdays, 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM ET

Can international law be a tool for promoting global justice? We will explore whether international criminal accountability for mass atrocity can deter human rights violations and satisfy victims.  Should reparations be given for slavery?  Can environmental law help reduce climate change and provide justice for climate refugees? Can trade law contribute to a fairer and more equitable trade system? Could better international health law mitigate a future crisis like COVID-19?  We will use a global...

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IGA 455 -2 Environmental Politics: Building Power Through Leadership, Persuasion and Negotiation

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Radolph Wentworth
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

 

In this perilous moment in human history, the world desperately needs leaders with the courage, drive and hardball political skills to fight climate change and help restore the natural world. At the same time, we need leaders who will advocate for social equity, recognizing how marginalized and low-income communities suffer disproportionately from pollution and climate change.Leadership is difficult in any enterprise, but it is especially difficult for environmental leaders who face opponents with...

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