Classes

GENED 1019: The Caribbean Crucible: Colonialism, Capitalism and Post-Colonial Misdevelopment In The Region

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Orlando Patterson

T, Th - 1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

 

How does the growing inequality between and within nations—which is the major global issue of our times—impact the Caribbean region and, in turn, its U.S. neighbor?

This course explores the complex, formative role of the Caribbean in the development of Western colonialism and capitalism and the consequences for the peoples of the region. Four major themes will be examined. First, the importance of the region in the origin and early development of Western imperialism...

Read more about GENED 1019: The Caribbean Crucible: Colonialism, Capitalism and Post-Colonial Misdevelopment In The Region

DPI 385M A: Race and Racism in the Making of the United States as a Global Power

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Khalil Muhammad

T, Th - 12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

This course is a core requirement for all MPP students. No other students are allowed to enroll at this time. The course is in response to longstanding efforts by HKS students, and most recently, the HKS Equity Coalition, to insist that understanding race and racism and their intersecting forms of power and oppression is essential to an excellent education at a policy school. The United States’ global dominance has long been the envy of the world. But the role of race to native born and newcomer alike has often...

Read more about DPI 385M A: Race and Racism in the Making of the United States as a Global Power

HIST-LIT 90FP: Atlantic Narratives and the Making of the Modern World

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Alison Glassie

Th - 9:45 am to 11:45 am

How has the ocean made the modern world? This course asks how stories of the Atlantic intersect with larger threads of world history such as empire, enslavement, and Indigenous dispossession. Mindful that the very word oceanography combines the Greek words for ocean and writing, we’ll investigate how biophysical conditions mediate cultural, historical, and even economic experience. How did Atlantic currents, prevailing winds, and fisheries facilitate the development of racial capitalism? And how do we write and...

Read more about HIST-LIT 90FP: Atlantic Narratives and the Making of the Modern World

RELIGION 1084 / HDS 3121: Encountering Motherhood: Sacred Histories

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Kimberly Patton

W - 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

 

Childbearing, pregnancy, and motherhood, and the uncanny bond between mother and child have been focalthemes in the history of religion since the Paleolithic period. This seminar considers the complex subject of motherhood through sacred histories from ancient Greece, Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Buddhism, Finnish epic, and select indigenous traditions. We will also read contemporary works in
matrifocal theology, evolutionary biology, sociology, and literature.

Enrollment is...

Read more about RELIGION 1084 / HDS 3121: Encountering Motherhood: Sacred Histories

HDS 3166: Ecotheology

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Dan McKanan

M, W - 9:00 am to 10:15 am

This course will survey constructive religious reflection that is informed by an ecological worldview and accountable to various forms of environmental activism. Readings will be drawn from a variety of religious and spiritual traditions, among them Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Paganism, religious naturalism, and Indigenous spirituality. We will pay special attention to the interplay between ecotheology and various theologies of liberation. Students will be invited to develop their own constructive...

Read more about HDS 3166: Ecotheology

HAA 197P: Introduction to Pre-Columbian America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Thomas Cummins

M, 12:45 pm to 2:45 pm (REMOTE)

This is a general introduction to and survey of the arts of Ancient America.  We will look at both Mesoamerica and the Andean art and architecture beginning with some of the earliest cultures and ending with Aztec, Maya, Muisca and Inca.  Questions about the materials, urban planning,meaning and aesthetics will be addressed.  The course will also take advantage of the great collections at the Peabody Museum as well as the MFA.  There are no prerequisites.

 

HIST-LIT 90FX: Imagining Latin America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Jennifer Alpert

W - 12:45 pm to 2:45 pm

“Latin America” refers to a geographical region, a culture, a form of racialization, a mode of being, and even a concept. How have these different characterizations imagined Latin America and its diaspora, and what kinds of myths and discourses emerged as a result? How have these imaginaries constructed Latin America as a homogeneous, cohesive whole, and to what effect? What do these representations erase, especially considering the heterogeneous cultural and linguistic traditions in the region? Throughout the...

Read more about HIST-LIT 90FX: Imagining Latin America

RELIGION 1589: Truths & Reconciliations

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Pamela Klassen

T - 9:00 am to 11:45 am

What responsibility do later generations have to remember and atone for the injustices of the past, even as they are perpetuated in the present? This course focuses on how projects of national public memory—especially commissions of “Truth and Reconciliation”—grapple with the demands of the past as they are experienced, ignored, and/or re-narrated by successive generations. Our class discussions will be oriented by readings from the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, which...

Read more about RELIGION 1589: Truths & Reconciliations

TDM 181B: Street Dance Activism: Co-choreographic Praxis as Activism

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Shamell Bell

W - 3:00 pm to 5:45 pm

In this participatory hybrid course, we explore the creation and implementation of Street Dance Activism as a Co-choreographic somatic[1] healing modality, and form of spiritual transcendence, through participating in the Global Dance Meditation for Black Liberation and deeply engaging with ...

Read more about TDM 181B: Street Dance Activism: Co-choreographic Praxis as Activism

MUSIC 160R: Composition Seminar: Working with Words

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Th - 9:45 am to 11:45 am

 

This course will explore how literary and other textual sources can provide the creative stimulus for original vocal and instrumental composition. From popular music to experimental contemporary music, how is it that the integration of words and music can achieve an expressive affect that is greater than the sum of the parts? Likewise, how can the concepts and sounds of a text influence and even determine the creative character of an instrumental composition?

In answering these questions, and by way of establishing...

Read more about MUSIC 160R: Composition Seminar: Working with Words

HDS 3300: Religious Literacy and the Professions

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Diane Moore

T, Th - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

Religions have functioned throughout human history to inspire and justify the full range of human agency from the heinous to the heroic. Their influences remain potent here in the 21st century in spite of modern predictions that religious influences would steadily decline in concert with the rise of secular democracies and advances in science. Professionals in a wide range of fields need to understand these complex religious influences in order to understand modern human affairs across the full spectrum of...

Read more about HDS 3300: Religious Literacy and the Professions

HIS 4495: Highways, Deforestation, and State-driven Colonization in Amazonia

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Ana Duran

M - 1:30 pm to 4:15 pm

 

Climate change has placed Amazonia at the center stage of global socio-environmental consciousness, particularly after the fires of 2019, which revealed the continental scale of land grabbing and deforestation in the region. Highways and paved roads have spearheaded the expansion of resource frontiers. They have also served as conduits for a complex process of state-driven colonization/urbanization which would more accurately be described as a favelization or entropic occupation of the rainforest. In this...

Read more about HIS 4495: Highways, Deforestation, and State-driven Colonization in Amazonia

SOCIOL 1163: Pursuing Truth and Justice: Principles and Methods of Equity through Inquiry

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Flavia Perea

T - 12:00 pm to 2:45 pm

This course will explore the principles and methodologies of equity-centered approaches for knowledge generation, meaning making, and social transformation through inquiry and the research process. We will examine community-based, participatory, action, and decolonizing approaches to inquiry, and engage with various perspectives on the process, practice, and applications of liberatory inquiry methodologies. We will discuss epistemology and research paradigms; explore a variety of approaches and methodologies, including...

Read more about SOCIOL 1163: Pursuing Truth and Justice: Principles and Methods of Equity through Inquiry

GENED 1089: The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Gabriela Soto Laveaga

T, Th - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

What can histories of tension and cooperation at the U.S.-Mexico border tell us about our own nation's public health programs and national racism?

Why does the Mexico-U.S. border continue to be a space for debate and controversy? This course examines how the creation of the U.S.-Mexico border in 1848 shaped modern Mexican society from the nineteenth century to our present. For many, the border served (and serves) as a protective barrier from poverty, violence, and,...

Read more about GENED 1089: The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

EMR 1010: Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Americo Mendoza-Mori

M, W - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

This course is intended to provide hands-on practice toward doing research on Latinx issues, with an approach grounded in the understanding that terms ‘Hispanic’ and ‘Latinidad’ are not static concepts and, at the same time, not a homogeneous mix. We will examine culture, intellectual production, languages, economics, and political thought, as well as the dynamics of Latino/a/e people in the United States. Throughout the class, students will become familiar with a wide range of thinkers, currents, concepts...

Read more about EMR 1010: Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

Pages