Classes

ANTHRO 2859: Colonial Encounters, Postcolonial Disorders

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Joseph Gone and Byron Good 
Time(s): Tuesdays, TBD

This course will engage three major themes. First, it will review issues related to the complex relationships between anthropology and colonialism(s) and their after lives in the postcolonial settings in which anthropologists work. While it is not a course focused narrowly on anthropology and...

Read more about ANTHRO 2859: Colonial Encounters, Postcolonial Disorders

HISTORY 1006: Introduction to Native American and Indigenous

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Philip J Deloria 
Monday/Wednesday, 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM 

In the 2010 U.S. Census, 5.2 million people identified themselves as being of American Indian or Alaska Native descent.  Of these, 2.9 million identified themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native alone, about 1.7 percent of the nation’s population.  These demographics...

Read more about HISTORY 1006: Introduction to Native American and Indigenous

EDU T017: Alternative Modes of Education

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Houman Harouni
Thursday 5:00pm-8:00pm

The purpose of this course is to question prevailing, relatively uniform and quite limiting forms of education in light of approaches that escape or overcome these forms. A mode of education is more than mere content and pedagogy. It refers to ways of knowing, forms of life, conceptions of power, value systems, and structuring goals that ultimately underlie a people’s understanding of what education is and does. Therefore, this course concerns more than a simple familiarity with alternative models of learning—rather,...

Read more about EDU T017: Alternative Modes of Education

EDU S515 Emancipatory Inquiry: Listening, Learning, and Acting for Social Change

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Aaliyah El-Amin
Wednesdays, 1:00pm-4:00pm

Throughout history, social justice movements and social justice organizations have utilized disciplined inquiry or research to highlight untold stories, illuminate goodness, expose power and colonialism, and offer pathways to more equity and freedom. Yet, we often do not provide educators or doctoral students with research methodology training oriented to these aims. More specifically, we often do not provide educators in the field or doctoral students with research methodology training beyond those...

Read more about EDU S515 Emancipatory Inquiry: Listening, Learning, and Acting for Social Change

WOMGEN 1455 Women, Men, and Other Animals

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Mel Chen
Tuesdays, 3:00 PM-5:00 PM

This course explores ways in which human collectives have conceived of other animals, whether in analogical relations for scientific research, exploitative relations for food and labor, affective relations like fear, disgust, love. What are some histories of these unique interdependencies between human animals and nonhuman animals? We will critically explore the relentless and yet slippery divisions between humans and nonhuman animals, seeing them as a falsely singular, conflictual and segregatory divide that has played...

Read more about WOMGEN 1455 Women, Men, and Other Animals

HIST-LIT 90EA Water Justice and Resistance in the Americas

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

James Mestaz
Tuesday 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

Water is life, but is it a human right? Water governance is a contentious issue globally because humans rely on water for nearly every productive activity; moreover, it is often scarce and not distributed equally. To better understand the persistence and escalation of struggles over water access around the world, this course uses a multidisciplinary approach that allows students to examine both the social and physical shape of water in a modern and historical context. While all bodies of water deserve mention,...

Read more about HIST-LIT 90EA Water Justice and Resistance in the Americas

GENED 1135 Interracial Encounters in American Literature and Culture

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Ju Yon Kim
Tuesday and Thursdays, 1:30 PM - 02:45 PM

From depictions of exchanges in the early colonial Americas to efforts to envision alternate and imminent futures, this class will examine representations of interracial encounters in U.S. American culture. We will explore how various texts and performances have conceived, embodied, and reimagined the relationships not only among differently racialized groups, but also between race and nation, individual and community, and art and politics. Topics addressed in this course will include narratives of indigeneity,...

Read more about GENED 1135 Interracial Encounters in American Literature and Culture

HISTSCI 123CS Starstruck! The History, Culture, and Politics of American Astronomy

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Sara Schechner
Tuesdays, 3:00pm-5:45pm

This hands-on course will introduce key episodes and issues in the history of American astronomy by close looking at rare early scientific instruments and tangible objects in Harvard collections.  Starting with the story of Captain John Smith, Pocahontas, and a sundial, the course will move from colonial relations with Native Americans to the controversial placement of observatories on sacred mountaintops today.  In between, we will discuss the roles of religion, politics, science, and culture in the...

Read more about HISTSCI 123CS Starstruck! The History, Culture, and Politics of American Astronomy

HIST 1054: From the Little Ice Age to Climate Change: Introduction to US Environmental History

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Zachary Nowak
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00am-10:15am

What’s the problem with wilderness? Or the environmental movement? Or invasive species?  This course examines how humans thought about and used the natural world over the centuries—and the consequences of both use of and thoughts about the nature. Students will learn about food, climate change, pollution, conquest and resistance, environmentalism, and energy. This course actively seeks to show the importance of the material world and the contributions of a broad spectrum of historical actors to US...

Read more about HIST 1054: From the Little Ice Age to Climate Change: Introduction to US Environmental History

UPDATE: EMR 133/WGS 1204 Power, Knowledge, Identity: Critical Approaches to Race and Ethnicity: Power, Knowledge, Identity

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Eleanor Craig
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:30am-11:45am

How might critical attention to race and ethnicity as they intersect with gender and sexuality—and also frameworks of indigeneity and class—shape how we study? How do these lenses shift the questions we ask, the information that counts as data, and the genres of work that we recognize as 'academic'?For those newer to studies of race and ethnicity, this course provides intersectional frameworks for recognizing what assumptions undergird academic projects and fields of study. For...

Read more about UPDATE: EMR 133/WGS 1204 Power, Knowledge, Identity: Critical Approaches to Race and Ethnicity: Power, Knowledge, Identity

❖ ANTHRO 1082 Moundbuilders, Birdmen, and Earth Monsters: The Archaeology of Eastern North America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Robert Cook
Wednesdays, 9:00am-11:45am

This course introduces the archaeological study of the ancient societies of eastern North America, with a focus on the Ohio River Valley region, the first frontier of the United States. We will explore inter-related aspects of religion, economy, technology, and human biology associated with the span of time ranging from the first arrival of humans to the European invasion of the continent. The emphasis is on key forms and changes in social organization associated with shifts between foraging and farming, the...

Read more about ❖ ANTHRO 1082 Moundbuilders, Birdmen, and Earth Monsters: The Archaeology of Eastern North America

ANTHRO 163 Megafauna Among Us: Humans and Other Charismatic Animals

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Zoe Eddy
Thursdays, 3:00pm-5:45pm

Whales, wolves, great apes, big cats, buffalo, bears-- these animals populate human cultural imaginations. From animal advocacy groups to zoos to movies, so-called "charismatic megafauna" and/or “flagship species” dominate a wide swath of debates. By focusing on a selection of animals, this course explores a) how people interpret these animals, and b) how human interactions impact these animals and their natural environments. Organized around different animals and the controversies, questions, and events...

Read more about ANTHRO 163 Megafauna Among Us: Humans and Other Charismatic Animals

Pages