Classes

GENED 1089 The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021
Why does the Mexico-U.S. border continue to be a space for debate and controversy? This course examines how the creation of the U.S.-Mexico border in 1848 shaped modern Mexican society from the nineteenth century to our present. For many, the border served (and serves) as a protective barrier from poverty, violence, and, especially, disease. By the early twentieth century many Mexican bodies were perceived as “alien,” “illegal,” and in need of patrolling. Yet these descriptions were also used by Mexican politicians to describe and isolate groups such as Indigenous and Chinese within... Read more about GENED 1089 The Border: Race, Politics, and Health in Modern Mexico

GOV 94MK The Politics of Land, Resources, and Colonialism in North America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Katie Mazer
Dates/Times: TBA

This course examines the colonial basis of the continental political economy of the United States and Canada, which has long been understood as the United States’ main resource hinterland. It offers students a range of analytical tools through which to understand contemporary contestation over land and resources in both countries. Drawing on writings by political scientists, geographers, anthropologists, and historians, the course moves between theories of nature and settler colonialism; Indigenous perspectives that transcend and exceed...

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IGA 455 -2 Environmental Politics: Building Power Through Leadership, Persuasion and Negotiation

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Radolph Wentworth
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

 

In this perilous moment in human history, the world desperately needs leaders with the courage, drive and hardball political skills to fight climate change and help restore the natural world. At the same time, we need leaders who will advocate for social equity, recognizing how marginalized and low-income communities suffer disproportionately from pollution and climate change.Leadership is difficult in any enterprise, but it is especially difficult for environmental leaders who face opponents with...

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HIST-LIT 90ES Prison Abolition

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Thomas Dichter
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

Is prison abolition a serious proposal, an aspirational ideal, a trendy slogan, or a blueprint for social transformation? This interdisciplinary and community-engaged course situates the prison abolition movement in deep historical context and explores its current relation to the politics of criminal justice reform. We will study the movement’s connections to slavery abolitionism, anti-lynching activism, Indigenous struggles for sovereignty, and the Black Power movement. We will examine the emergence...

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EMR 145 Latinx Xicanx Indigeneities

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Marcelo Garzo
Wednesdays, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET

In this advanced seminar course, we will explore questions of indigeneity and decolonization in Latinx and Xicanx communities and diasporas across Abya Yala (the Americas, including the Caribbean). Thinking from the intersections of Latinx/Xicanx and Native/Indigenous Studies and communities — and through a comparative and critical Ethnic Studies lens — we will trace key terms and concepts that emerge from these important transdisciplinary fields, social movements and debates. How does indigeneity relate to concepts such as...

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EXPOS 20 204 Wastelands

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Collier Brown
Undergraduate Seminar
Dates/Time: TBA

The impenetrable wilderness of The Revenant, the diseased streets of Children of Men, the trash heap cities of Wall-E—these are the wastelands that fascinate our pop culture. On the screen, they come to life as horrifying alternate universes and dead civilizations—the very fates we must avoid at all costs. And yet wastelands are not exclusively the stuff of science fiction. In this course, we will grapple with both imaginary and actual wastelands. We will begin with short...

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HIST 1636 Intro to Harvard History: Beyond the Three Lies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Zach Nowak
Mondays/Wednesdays, 7:30 PM - 8:45 PM ET

Harvard’s history is a story of professors, students, courses, and research that has led to world-changing innovations. But it is also a story of student unrest, gender unease, and the exclusion of women and minorities, enslaved people, Native Americans, and working-class people. All of them made Harvard and left traces in its archives, libraries, and museums, its buildings, and even in its soil. Some Harvard stories have been told; others have been forgotten. In this class, we will uncover Harvard’s past...

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ENG 190EV Voices of Environmental Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Sarah Dimick
Mondays/Wednesdays, 3:00 PM - 4:15 PM ET

This course considers the relationships between systems of human injustice and environmental issues—including industrial disasters, ocean acidification, and resource extraction. We examine environmental justice writing and artwork with a transnational, interconnected approach. For example, we ask how the Ogoni activist Ken Saro-Wiwa’s writing on oil pipelines in the Niger Delta anticipates Native American protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline. We draw connections between a poem documenting...

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GENED 1159 American Capitalism

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Sven Beckert
Tuesdays/Thursdays/ 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

How did capitalism emerge, expand and transform daily life in North America over the past 500 years? In this course, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how North America turned from a minor outpost of the Atlantic economy into the powerhouse of the world economy, how Americans built a capitalist economy and how that capitalism, in turn, changed every aspect of their lives.  In the process, they will come to understand how contemporary capitalism is the result of centuries of human engagement, struggle...

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DEV 501M Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building I

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Joe Kalt
January Term, 1/12, 1/13, 1/14, 1/15

This course examines the challenges that contemporary Native American tribes and nations face as they endeavor to rebuild their communities, strengthen their cultures, and support their citizens. The range of issues that Native leaders and policymakers confront is wide and encompass political sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, cultural promotion, land and water rights, religious freedom, health and social welfare, and education. Because the challenges are broad and comprehensive, the course emphasizes the...

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GOV 1338 Institutional Development in Native America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Dan Carpenter
Mondays/Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET

Examines the challenges and strategies of advocacy, sovereignty building and institutional development among Native Nations in the U.S.  Includes engaged scholarship working with Native Nations on these issues.

HIST 97P "What is Indigenous History?"

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Phil Deloria
Sophomore Tutorial, History Department
Wednesdays, 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM ET

What is it to be Indigenous?  Is indigeneity a contemporary political formation, the product of centuries of colonial and imperial incursions into the lands of others?  Is it an aboriginal, autochthonous presence that has existed from ancient time, with a continuity based on both survival and self-possession?  Or something else entirely?  While many first peoples prefer culturally specific identities over the general term indigenous, others embrace Indigeneity...

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HIST 1015 Native American Women: History and Myth

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Tiya Miles
Teaching Fellow: Sarah Sadlier
Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM ET

This combined lecture/discussion course explores histories of women from diverse Indigenous nations within the current boundaries of the United States. The course traces multiple themes that intersect Native women’s lives: concepts of family and intimate relationships; spiritual understandings and notions of tradition; gender roles and cross-cultural gender difference; processes and kinds of colonialism, conceptions of land and effects of land dispossession; cultural negotiation, change, and...

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WOMGEN 97: Tutorial - Sophomore Year “Dreams of a Common Language”

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2020

Caroline Light
Tuesday/Thursday 10:30 am - 11:45 am

This course provides an introduction (in no way exhaustively) to key concepts and texts in the study of women, gender, and sexuality. Together, we will develop a shared vocabulary to help prepare you for advanced study in the concentration. We will become adept in using foundational concepts such as essentialism, historical “waves” of feminism, intersectionality, homonationalism, neoliberalism, borderlands, mestiza consciousness, critical trans studies, and gender as a category of analysis. We will...

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STU 1501 This Land is Your Land (M1)

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Daniel D'Oca
Tuesday/Thursday  2:00 pm - 6:00 pm

 

In the US, there are over 300 federal Indian reservations, covering over 50 million acres of land in 36 states. However, a majority of Native Americans—as many as 78 percent—live off reservations in urban areas. Since the passage of the Indian Relocation Act of 1956, which encouraged Native Americans to assimilate into the general population by moving to cities, the population of so-called “urban Indians” has been increasing rapidly. But the assumptions behind the Indian Relocation Act and similarly...

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