Indigenous Units/Readings in Course

HIST-LIT 90ES: Prison Abolition

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Thomas Dichter

W - 12:00pm to 2:45pm

s prison abolition a serious proposal, an aspirational ideal, a trendy slogan, or a blueprint for social transformation? This interdisciplinary and community-engaged course situates the prison abolition movement in deep historical context and explores its current relation to the politics of criminal justice reform. We will study the movement’s connections to slavery abolitionism, anti-lynching activism, Indigenous struggles for sovereignty, and the Black Power movement. We will examine the emergence of...

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HIST 15O: Australia and the Economic Development of Settler Colonial Societies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Simon Ville

M - 12:45pm to 2:45pm

Australian experience provides a lens from which to cast a wide historical view of the development of settler societies over two centuries, drawing comparisons with Canada, Argentina, Uruguay, South Africa and New Zealand. Despite their common focus on natural resources production and close engagement with the international economy, the experience of these economies often differed. Themes include: geography versus institutions as development determinants; colonialism’s impact on indigenous economy; and the...

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SBS 535: Global Perspectives on Racism, Poverty, and Power

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Margareta Matache

M, W - 9:45am to 11:15am

The course uses interdisciplinary, critical, and transnational/global perspectives to study racism and other systems of oppression, poverty, and the disempowerment of peoples subordinated based on race, gender, and class. The sessions include readings regarding the experiences of Black Americans, Burakumin people, Dalit people, Jewish people, Romani people, Palestinians, and other oppressed and racialized peoples.
This is an introductory course examining four main topics to be discussed in...

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MUSIC 270R: Composing Australia and Beyond: A Personal History

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Andrew Schultz

T - 3:00pm to 5:00pm

The seminars will be based around some themes and questions in the discussion of music in Australia and beyond, with an emphasis on my personal experience and output as a composer and on the work of other musicians and composers.

Topics to be covered may include:
• landscape, seascape, open space and ‘country’;
• tradition, innovation and influence in indigenous music;
• ‘irreconcilable synchronicities’ - cross-cultural music encounters;
• “Did you use the didj?’ - artistic debates about...

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IGA 455: Environmental Politics: Persuasion, Advocacy and Negotiation

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Rand Wentworth

M, W - 12:00pm to 1:15pm

The world is on fire. Smoke darkens the sky. Scorching heat. Violent storms. Mass extinction.

In this perilous moment in human history, the world desperately needs leaders with the courage, drive and hardball political skills to fight climate change and help restore the natural world. Environmental leaders must also recognize how marginalized communities suffer disproportionately from pollution and climate change. Leadership is difficult in any enterprise, but it is especially...

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IGA 105: International Law and Global Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Kathryn Sikkink

M, W - 1:30pm to 2:45pm

Can international law be a tool for promoting global justice? In this class, we will explore diverse issues such as why the laws of war didn’t constrain the Russian invasion of the Ukraine and whether international criminal accountability for mass atrocity can deter human rights violations and satisfy victims?  How could reparations for slavery be delivered?  Can environmental law help reduce climate change and provide justice for climate refugees? Can trade law contribute to a fairer and...

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HLS 3194: Regional Human Rights Law: The Inter-American Perspective

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Victor Madrigal-Borloz

Th - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Prerequisites: A prior or concurrent course or clinic in international human rights law is recommended but not required.

Exam Type: No Exam

During the last 70 years, the Inter-American System for the protection of human rights (IASHR) is the venue for some of the most significant developments in international law. Placed at the heart of the oldest international organization in existence (the Organization of American States, successor to...

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EDU T416: Transforming Justice: From Classroom to Cellblock to Community

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Kaia Stern

Th - 9:00am to 11:45am

How do we understand justice? What are the connections between trauma, education and mass incarceration? From cradle to prison cell, what is our praxis—that is, how do we do education, and what are its fruits? This course explores the systems of racialized punishment that have created the current conditions around school suspensions, arrests, and incarceration. It focuses on the growing movement for restorative/transformative justice, paying particular attention to factors...

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EDU A410A: Teaching the Hard Histories of Racism in the United States

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Adrienne Stang

W - 4:30pm to 7:15pm

*Lottery-based Enrollment* Engaging in conversations about racism, past and present, is essential to building bridges and promoting democratic values. Many educators wish to teach about racism but may hesitate to explore controversial topics with students, especially younger learners. In this course, participants develop the knowledge and skills to teach the histories and realities of racism in the United States. We consider the developmental needs of students in grades K-12, racial-...

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EDU A149: Leveraging Policy to Support Action on Climate Change in the Education Sector

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Laura Schifter

F - Split Schedule: 9:00am to 12:00pm or 1:15pm - 2:30pm

The UN IPCC reports on climate change make it clear that to avoid the most devastating climate impacts, we need a global societal transformation, and we all have a role to play in advancing solutions. Education has been identified as a critical social tipping point to help the world meet the decarbonization needed by 2050, and yet education is underutilized in climate solutions. Whether transitioning our largely diesel school bus fleet to electric, leveraging post-...

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BETH766: U.S. Eugenics: Legacies and Resurgences

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Professor: Charlene Galarneau

W - 6:00pm to 8:00pm

An exploration of the ethics of scientific and social eugenics in 20th/21st century U.S. through historical, bioethical, critical race, Indigenous, gender, and disability frameworks. Attention to roles of medicine, law, and government in relation to eugenic techniques: sterilization, segregation, and marriage restriction as well as genetic technologies, land conservation, and immigration policy. Consideration of resistance to eugenics (moral, scientific, religious, artistic, political) and recent strategies of...

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GENED 1019: The Caribbean Crucible: Colonialism, Capitalism and Post-Colonial Misdevelopment In The Region

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Orlando Patterson

T, Th - 1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

 

How does the growing inequality between and within nations—which is the major global issue of our times—impact the Caribbean region and, in turn, its U.S. neighbor?

This course explores the complex, formative role of the Caribbean in the development of Western colonialism and capitalism and the consequences for the peoples of the region. Four major themes will be examined. First, the importance of the region in the origin and early development of Western imperialism...

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DPI 385M A: Race and Racism in the Making of the United States as a Global Power

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Khalil Muhammad

T, Th - 12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

This course is a core requirement for all MPP students. No other students are allowed to enroll at this time. The course is in response to longstanding efforts by HKS students, and most recently, the HKS Equity Coalition, to insist that understanding race and racism and their intersecting forms of power and oppression is essential to an excellent education at a policy school. The United States’ global dominance has long been the envy of the world. But the role of race to native born and newcomer alike has often...

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HIST-LIT 90FP: Atlantic Narratives and the Making of the Modern World

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Alison Glassie

Th - 9:45 am to 11:45 am

How has the ocean made the modern world? This course asks how stories of the Atlantic intersect with larger threads of world history such as empire, enslavement, and Indigenous dispossession. Mindful that the very word oceanography combines the Greek words for ocean and writing, we’ll investigate how biophysical conditions mediate cultural, historical, and even economic experience. How did Atlantic currents, prevailing winds, and fisheries facilitate the development of racial capitalism? And how do we write and...

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RELIGION 1084 / HDS 3121: Encountering Motherhood: Sacred Histories

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Kimberly Patton

W - 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

 

Childbearing, pregnancy, and motherhood, and the uncanny bond between mother and child have been focalthemes in the history of religion since the Paleolithic period. This seminar considers the complex subject of motherhood through sacred histories from ancient Greece, Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Buddhism, Finnish epic, and select indigenous traditions. We will also read contemporary works in
matrifocal theology, evolutionary biology, sociology, and literature.

Enrollment is...

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