HUNAP Faculty

HDS 2052: Religion and Liberation Around Toni Morrison and Gabriel García Márquez: Writings and Lives

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: David L. Carrasco

T - 12:00 pm to 1:59 pm

 1995 Toni Morrison and Gabriel García Márquez met for the first time in Mexico City and spoke about their writings, editors, lives and literary influences. This course is a comparative study of the religious dimensions in their writings and lives with special attention to the themes of colonialism and liberation, homeland and quests,  rememory and myths, Africa and Latin America,  goodness and evil, slavery and freedom.  More attention will be given to Morrison’s works and García...

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GENED 1148: Moctezuma's Mexico Then and Now: The Past, the Present and Pandemics in North America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professors: David L. Carrasco and William Fash

M, W - 10:30 am to 11:45 am

How does Mexico's rich cultural past shape contemporary Mexico and the US in the face of today's pandemics, protests and other challenges of the borderlands?

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore how the study of pre-Hispanic and Colonial Mexican and Latina/o cultures provide vital context for understanding today's changing world. The emphasis is on the mythical and social origins, glory days and political collapse of the Aztec...

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RELIGION 1590: Issues in the Study of Native American Religion

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Ann Braude

T, Th - 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Based around a series of traditionalist guest speakers, this course interrogates the study of religion in general and of Native American traditions in particular in light of indigenous religious experiences, perspectives and histories. Questions of appropriation, repatriation and religious freedom will be approached through legal as well as cultural frameworks.

HIST 1945: Slavery and Public History

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professor: Tiya Miles

T - 12:45 pm to 2:45 pm

Confronting vexed historical meanings and present-day uses of the past is the special charge of public historians. This course explores the theme of slavery through the lenses and methods of public history, a field of historical inquiry and applied knowledge production that stresses past-present connections, community engagement, collaborative work, and audiences beyond the academy. As a foundational element in the structure of U.S. society, slavery has made a lasting imprint on social, cultural, political, and...

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HIST 15H / ENGLISH 90LN: Harvard and Native Lands

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professors: Philip J. Deloria and Alan Niles

T - 9:45 am to 11:45 pm

Harvard’s beginnings included a promise to educate both “English and Indian youth,” but from its outset Harvard’s endowment included Native lands expropriated through war, theft, and coercion. This class will conduct original research on these histories, seeking to contribute a new understanding of Harvard’s institutional development and its historic and continuing impact on Native American peoples. We will work hands-on with Harvard’s archives, developing research skills in navigating...

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HIST 1006: Native American and Indigenous Studies: An Introduction

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Professors: Philip J. Deloria and Laura Johnson

M, W - 12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

Though American Indian people make up 1.7% of the U.S. population, their importance outweighs the census numbers.  Native American history and politics define critical issues in law, energy, land management, and government, while the culture industries inevitably confront the curious hold that indigenous people have on American culture.  American conquest and colonialism invite connection and comparison across a global scale, particularly in settler states such as Canada, Australia...

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HIST-LIT 10: Introduction to American Studies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor, Philip Deloria

Monday, Wednesday 10:30-11:45am

Course Site

American Studies is an interdisciplinary effort to understand the complicated social and cultural lives of people in—and in relation to—the United States, both past and present. The intersections of History and Literature shape much of American Studies, but the field has also been marked by forays into music, arts, ethnic studies, economics,...

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SUP 625: Land Loss, Reclamation, and Stewardship in Contemporary Native America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professors, Eric Henson, Daniel D'Oca, & Philip Deloria

Tuesday 10:30am-1:15pm

Course Site

This course will explore three critical dimensions in American Indian land issues: historical land loss, contemporary tribal governmental efforts at land reclamation, stewardship, and co-management.  We will begin by tracking the history of land dispossession from colonial settlement to the present day.  We...

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GENED 1032: Res Publica: A History of Representative Government

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor,  Daniel Carpenter

Monday, Wednesday 3:00pm-4:15pm

Course Site

“A republic, if you can keep it.” So did Benjamin Franklin characterize his hopes for American government. What did Franklin and others mean by republic, and why did he and so many others worry that it might be something hard to hold onto...

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ANTHRO 1475: Religious Dimensions in Human Experience: Apocalypse, Home, Medicine, Music, Sports, Sacrifice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor, David L. Carrasco

Monday, Wednesday 10:30-11:45am


Course Site

What is Religion? Why does it show up everywhere? Using archaeology, religious studies and social thought, this course will study the major themes in the history of religions including ‘encountering the holy’, 'sports and ritual’, ‘crossing borders’, ‘sacrifice as creation’, ‘pilgrimage and sacred place’, ‘suffering and quest for wisdom’, ‘...

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ANTHRO 1190: American Invasions: Archaeological Tales of Encounter, Exploration, and Colonization, 1492-1830

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor, Matt Liebmann

Monday, Wednesday 3:00-4:15pm

Course Site

In 1492 Native Americans discovered Europeans, changing the world forever.  The European invasion of the Americas triggered demographic, economic, and ecological changes on an unprecedented scale.  The subsequent movement of people, plants, animals, and goods prompted global shifts in population, exploitation of resources, and the...

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Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor Eric Henson

Friday, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

Course Site

This community based research course focuses on some of the major issues Native American Indian tribes and nations face in the 21st century. It provides in-depth, hands-on exposure to native development issues, including: sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, leadership, health and...

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Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building I

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor Joe Kalt

J-Term Course

Jan 1 - 22, 10 am - 4:30 pm

Course Site

This course examines the challenges that contemporary Native American tribes and nations face as they endeavor to rebuild their communities, strengthen their cultures, and support their citizens. The range of issues that Native leaders and policymakers confront is wide and...

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Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Professor Eric Henson

Friday, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

This community based research course focuses on some of the major issues Native American Indian tribes and nations face in the 21st century. It provides in-depth, hands-on exposure to native development issues, including: sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, leadership, health and social welfare, tribal finances, land and water rights, culture and language, religious freedom, and education. In particular, the course emphasizes problem definition, client relationships, and designing and completing...

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